The British Country Home

When one thinks of country houses, it’s easy to picture a lot of tweed and Chesterfield arm-chairs (and if tweed is what you are looking for, then head straight to the Northumbrian Tweed Company’s website), but the look of a traditional country home isn’t confined to that. From the use of natural sandstone in the Chilterns, or red bricks in Yorkshire, every corner of the country has its own special touch. However, there are a few small ways to make any house feel more like a country home, whether it’s a cottage in a small village in Cumbria or a 10 minutes-walk away from East Croydon Station.

© 2016 Crown Copyright, The National Archives, Kew| C. E. & J. G. Potter, Lancashire, UK, 1856 |James Boswell, Dublin, Ireland, 1846 | Christopher Dresser for William Cooke, Leeds, UK, 1860 | C. E. & J. G. Potter, Lancashire, UK, 1856

5 Trends in Victorian Interiors

Queen Victoria, born on this day in 1819, has reigned over Britain and its empire for over 63 years. The most interesting feature about the time is that, unlike the period that precedes it, there is no such thing as a Victorian style. It was a period vibrant with experimentation, embracing new cultures and reviving historical styles (most famously gothic, but also rococo).

Made in Clerkenwell 2017

Yesterday (14th of May 2017) I’ve had the pleasure to attend Craft Central’s Made in Clerkenwell event. Designers opened their studios for the day, some of them working (I was able to observe for a few fascinating moments the work of violin makers Ruschil and Bailly, which is not a kind of craft you expect to see every day), but mostly it was a showcase of products with the ability to buy them, and most designers happy to have a chat about their work.

(c) Martha Stewart

5 favourites for the home in the colour of “natural optimism”

Twinings and Pantone have teamed up to create a colour that would give you an instant mood lift. As we near the end of Mental Health Awareness Week, we think it’s great to remind ourselves that even those who do not suffer from mental illnesses need to take care of their wellbeing (and at L&Y we are trying to be more intentional with our living), so we are really keen on this new colour. Also, blue is my own lifelong favourite colour, so I’m partial to it regardless. So, if you’re up for spending some money why don’t you take a look at our favourites for the home in this new colour (or close shades), and maybe donate something to a mental health charity while at that? 

Hygge for the Summer

This past winter, this weirdly-pronounced word (it’s Danish) was all the rage in Britain. In our dark and cold nights, the idea of “a quality of cosiness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or wellbeing” just seemed the perfect antidote to feeling of bleakness worthy of a Dickens’ novel. However, hygge is about intentional living, not curling up on the couch with tea and a soft woollen blanket per se. As Britain approaches the season when it’s socially acceptable to host a barbeque no matter whether the sun is actually out, and sales of Pimm’s skyrocket, there is no need to be jealous of our Danish cousins across the sea: hygge for the summer is something most of us have already been doing, we just didn’t have a fancy word to make us feel like we were on trend.